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On March 11, 2014 Dr James Rippe, MD gave the Keynote Speech at the National Restaurant Association meeting for Nutrition Professionals entitled 'Obesity – Is sugar to blame?'

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March 31, 2014

Contact: Carol Moreau – cmoreau@rippelifestyle.com (508) 756-1228

New Textbook on the Consumption of Sugar/Fructose
Offers a Unique Nutrition Resource for Health Professionals

Nation’s Leading Medical/Nutritional Experts Provide Scientific Evidence on the Various Effects of Consuming Caloric Sweeteners

SHREWSBURY, MA – A new textbook, Fructose, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Sucrose and Health , published this month by Springer Press, under their Humana Press imprint, provides one of the most comprehensive scientific analyses on the closely-watched issue of caloric sweetener consumption. It represents the most up-to-date review of relevant scientific data that seeks to provide facts and dispel myths for audiences that often receive conflicting information about sugar/fructose consumption.

Chapters in the book discuss the effects of both nutritive and non-nutritive sweeteners on appetite and food consumption, as well as the physiologic and neurologic responses to sweetness. Chapter authors are world class, practice and research oriented nutrition authorities. They provide practical, data-driven resources based upon the totality of the evidence to help the reader understand the basics of fructose, high fructose corn syrup and sucrose biochemistry. The textbook also examines the short-term and long-term consequences of consuming these sweeteners in the diets of young children through to adolescence and adulthood.

“The issue of sugar and fructose consumption is one of the more prominent health issues currently being debated and there is quite a bit of misinformation and hyperbole in this issue,” said the textbook’s editor, James M. Rippe, MD, Founder and Director of the Rippe Lifestyle Institute and Professor of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Central Florida. “We were fortunate to get some of the best minds in the field of nutritional science to provide unvarnished, scientific facts about this issue in hopes of providing greater public understanding and a strong foundation for future scientific research in this field.”

Some chapter highlights include:

  • “Added Sugars and Health” by John L. Sievenpiper, MD, PhD., McMaster University : “Concerns raised by fructose’s unique biochemistry and the ecological and animal studies linking added fructose to various diseases have not been supported by higher level evidence. Evidence from prospective cohort studies and controlled feeding trials when taken together has not shown convincing evidence of harm of added fructose-containing sugars over and above that of other carbohydrate sources of energy in the diet.”
  • “Are Sugars Addictive?” by Rebecca L. Corwin, Ph.D., RD, Pennsylvania State University and John E. Hayes, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University: “We and others have argued against the idea that food addiction is widespread and functions as a driving force behind the current obesity epidemic. Even the idea that a small segment of the population, such as those with Bulimia Nervosa or a subpopulation of those with Binge Eating Disorder, is addicted to food is questionable and should be approached with caution.”
  • “Sweeteners and the Brain” by Athylia Paremski and Miguel Alonso-Alonso, MD, MPhil, Harvard Medical School: “Cognition can influence food intake at multiple stages. High-level cognitive inputs, such as the sight of a word, can modulate the activity of brain regions that are involved in processing sensory characteristics of a particular food, such as taste and smell, and the resulting reward value. There is also data suggesting that cognitive suppression of hunger and craving elicited by cues of palatable food engages the activity of a distributed brain network comprising lateral and dorsomedial parts of the prefrontal cortex. Additionally, it is well-known that branding can have a profound impact in the way a food product is perceived, specifically in the case of a sweetened beverage.”
  • “Non-Nutritive Sweeteners” by John D. Fernstrom, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine: “The influence of non-nutritive sweeteners on incretion secretion and action is still an unfinished area of investigation, but human studies in which NNS are covertly added to the diet for as long as 18 months, uniformly show that chronic NNS ingestion does not stimulate food intake or cause weight gain.”
  • “Sweeteners and Diabetes” by Adrian I. Cozma, HBSC, University of Toronto; Vanessa Ha, M.S.; Viranda H. Jayalath, M.S. (candidate); Russell J. de Souza RD, Sc.D., McMaster University; and John L. Sievenpiper MD, PhD., McMaster University: “Much of the evidence cited in support for a role of sugars in the increasing prevalence of obesity is derived from weak animal and ecological studies that establish associations, but not cause and effect relationships… the current evidence fails to show a clear link with, or between, sucrose and fructose and the increasing incidence of diabetes.

If you wish to learn more about Fructose, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Sucrose and Health, please visit Springer.com.

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Dr. Rippe is a cardiologist and graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Medical School. His research laboratory has conducted numerous studies and is published widely in the areas of nutrition and weight management. He is an advisor to the food and beverage industry. Dr. Rippe’s research laboratory has received unrestricted grant funding to conduct research trials and Dr. Rippe has received consulting fees from a variety of companies, organizations, publishers or trade associations that utilize, market or publish information about fructose, high fructose corn syrup or sucrose and hence, have an ongoing interest in the metabolism and health effects of these sugars.
He is the Founder and Director of the Rippe Lifestyle Institute, and is a Professor of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Central Florida.

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Florida Trend January 2014

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The American College of Lifestyle Medicine (ACLM) hosts its annual conference, October 27 – 30, 2013, at the Renaissance Arlington Capitol View Hotel in Crystal City, VA – just outside of Washington D.C. The conference will feature prominent keynote speakers such as Dr. James Rippe.

Dr. Rippe will discuss grounding lifestyle medicine in the overwhelming body of scientific literature available demonstrating how daily habits and actions impact on short and long term health and quality of life. Dr. Rippe will specifically draw from his experience as editor in chief of the following publications:

  • Lifestyle Medicine (2nd Edition; published April 2013)
  • Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine and Health (published February 2012)
  • American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine (published bi-monthly)

These three publications form the academic basis for the evidence supporting the important role of lifestyle medicine in various aspects of health.

For more information: flyer or website

Follow the ACLM on Twitter (@ACLifeMed, hashtag #LifeMed2013) and Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/lifestylemed).

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New Study Finds Neither HFCS nor Table Sugar Increases Liver Fat under “Real World” Conditions

Adds to Scientific Evidence that the Sweeteners are Metabolically Equivalent

Shrewsbury, MA (Febraury 12, 2013) A study published today in the Journal of Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism presented compelling data showing the consumption of both high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and sucrose (table sugar) at levels consistent with average daily consumption do not increase liver fat in humans, a leading cause of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The findings also add to an already well-established body of science that high fructose corn syrup and table sugar are metabolically equivalent.

Increased fat levels in the liver and muscle tissue have also shown to contribute to insulin resistance, a key factor in the development of type 2 diabetes.

The study, conducted by James Rippe, MD, Founder and Director of the Rippe Lifestyle Institute and Professor of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Central Florida, examined sixty-four individuals who consumed low-fat milk sweetened with either HFCS or sucrose with the added sugar matching the 25th, 50th and 90th percentile population consumption levels of fructose for ten weeks.

The results showed fat content of the liver remained unchanged when the six HFCS and sucrose groups were averaged. Fat content in muscle tissue was also unchanged over the 10 weeks when the six HFCS and sucrose groups were averaged.

“The study’s results are compelling because this is the first study of its kind to test the effects of HFCS and sucrose on liver fat levels in humans using real world conditions,” said Dr. Rippe, who received a grant from the Corn Refiners Association (CRA) to conduct the study. “Previous studies that sought to find a link between caloric sweeteners and diseases such as type 2 diabetes and liver disease often subjected individuals to unrealistically high levels of fructose or had subjects consume fructose independent of glucose, which is just not how fructose is consumed in our daily diet. Using real world conditions, we find that HFCS and other caloric sweeteners do not appear to increase liver fat or contribute to insulin resistance.”

The two largest sources of fructose in the human diet are sucrose (containing 50% fructose and 50% glucose) and HFCS which is present in the human diet in two forms: HFCS-55 (which consists of 55% fructose, 42% glucose and 3% other carbohydrates) and HFCS-42 (which consists of 42% fructose and 58% glucose).

“This study seems to confirm what physicians, registered dietitians and healthcare associations such as the American Medical Association have been saying for decades,” said Dr. Mark Haub, Associate Professor in the Department of Nutrition at Kansas State University. “Not only is it safe to consume caloric sweeteners at recommended levels, it is important for consumers to understand that high fructose corn syrup and table sugar have the same amount of calories and studies like this indicate your body metabolizes them about the same.”

For further information or to obtain a copy of this study, please visit www.nrcresearchpress.com/journal/apnm

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Dr. Rippe is a cardiologist and graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Medical School. His research laboratory has conducted numerous studies and published widely in the areas of nutrition and weight management. He is an advisor to the food and beverage industry and has received unrestricted educational grants from the Corn Refiners Association. He is the Founder and Director of the Rippe Lifestyle Institute, and Professor of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Central Florida.

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Looking to Lose Weight? New Study Shows Sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup Perform Equally on a Reduced Calorie Diet

Shrewsbury, MA (August 9, 2012) A new study published in Nutrition Journal shows that people can lose weight while consuming typical amounts of sugar or high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) if their overall caloric intake is reduced.

“Our research debunks the vilification of high fructose corn syrup in the diet,” said James M. Rippe, M.D., one of the study authors. “The results show that equally reduced-calorie diets caused similar weight loss regardless of the type or amount of added sugars. This lends further support to findings by our research group and others that table sugar and HFCS are metabolically equivalent.”

The results are significant for those trying to lose weight and anyone concerned about the type of added sugars in foods and beverages they consume. Importantly, this study looks at sweeteners consumed in real-world diets and at levels that are typical among American consumers.

“We wanted to design a study that would generate information that is useful and applicable to the way people actually eat, not speculative results on simulated laboratory diets that focus on one component at extreme dietary levels,” explained Dr. Rippe.

The study design included 247 overweight or obese subjects ages 25 to 60 who took part in the randomized, double blind trial. After 12 weeks on a hypocaloric (reduced calorie) diet, there was no evidence that either table sugar or HFCS prevented weight loss when the amount of overall calories was reduced.

“Misinformation about added sugars, particularly high fructose corn syrup, has caused many people to lose sight of the fact that there is no silver bullet when it comes to weight loss,” said Dr. Rippe. “A reduction in calorie consumption, along with exercise and a balanced diet, is what’s most important when it comes to weight loss.”

Links: Abstract and Full Study

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Dr. Rippe is a cardiologist and graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Medical School. His research laboratory has conducted numerous studies and published widely in the areas of nutrition and weight management. He is an advisor to the food and beverage industry including the Corn Refiners Association, which funded this research with an unrestricted educational grant. He is the Founder and Director of the Rippe Lifestyle Institute, and Professor of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Central Florida.

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CLINICIANS ARE ARMED WITH NEW ACADEMIC TEXTBOOK IN 2012

OBESITY: PREVENTION AND TREATMENT

EDITED BY DR. JAMES RIPPE AND DR. TED ANGELOPOULOS

(June 8, 2012) The prevalence of obesity in the United States and the rest of the industrialized world has skyrocketed in the past 20 years. With over two thirds of the adult population just in the US either overweight or obese, clinicians from all branches of medicine are in desperate need of guidance so that they may play an active role in diagnosing and treating obesity and its related conditions. Linked to heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome, it is also the leading cause of osteoarthritis and the second leading cause of cancer. Now, the new academic textbook Obesity: Prevention And Treatment edited by James M. Rippe, MD and Ted Angelopoulos, PhD, MPH, arms clinicians with the information they need to create an appropriate prevention and treatment program for their patients.

With contributions from leading experts in the field, Obesity: Prevention and Treatment bridges the gap between emerging understanding of the pathophysiology of obesity with concrete clinical applications for physicians and other healthcare workers in all disciplines of medicine.

Obesity: Prevention And Treatment includes nutritional aspects, exercise management, and behavioral management of overweight and obese patients. It presents practical applications and resources including commercial weight loss programs and books, as well as Internet tools and resources to manage the obese patient. It discusses public policy implications and future directions in obesity research. It is designed for clinicians in all fields of medicine as well as other healthcare professionals.

Following an overview of issues related to the prevention and management of obesity, the book discusses:

  • Energy balance, the metabolic predictors of weight gain, and the role of adipokines, genetics, and the environment on obesity
  • The epidemiology of obesity
  • The identification and evaluation of the overweight patient as a guide to the selection of treatment
  • Nutritional aspects of obesity treatment and management
  • Exercise risks to which the obese patient may be more prone and steps that can be taken to mitigate these risks
  • Behavior modification strategies for the obese patient
  • The definition, assessment, consequences, and treatment of childhood obesity
  • Drugs and surgical options for treatment
  • The implications of public policy on the problem of obesity
  • The significance of intra-abdominal and ectopic fat deposition in endocrine aspects of obesity

James M. Rippe, MD, is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Medical School with postgraduate training at Massachusetts General Hospital. He is currently the Founder and Director of the Rippe Lifestyle Institute (RLI) and Professor of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Central Florida, where he also serves as the Chairman of the Center for Lifestyle Medicine. Over the past 20 years, Dr. Rippe has established and run the largest research organization (RLI) in the world, exploring how daily habits and actions impact short- and long-term health and quality of life. This organization has published hundreds of papers that form the scientific basis for the fields of lifestyle medicine and high-performance health. RLI also conducts numerous studies every year on nutrition and healthy weight management.

Theodore J. Angelopoulos, PhD, MPH, is a former scholar of Greece's National Secretary of Education and has pursued training in exercise physiology and epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He also completed a three-year postdoctoral training in metabolism at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis. He is currently a Professor in the Department of Health Professions and Director of the Laboratory of Applied Physiology at the University of Central Florida, Orlando, where he also served as Research Director of the Center for Lifestyle Medicine (2006-2010). Dr. Angelopoulos' major research areas include metabolism and physiogenomics. He has developed a strong research partnership with the Exercise and Genetics Collaborative Research Group and has received funds from the National Institutes of Health and from industry sponsors

The Rippe Health publishing team has written or edited 45 books and remains active in all aspects of writing, editing, and publishing. Irwin and Rippe's Procedures, Techniques and Minimally Invasive Monitoring in Intensive Care Medicine, which is a companion book to Irwin and Rippe's Intensive Care Medicine, has also been published recently.

Additionally, a two-volume Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine and Health, edited by Dr. Rippe, was published in December 2011 (SAGE Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA). The second edition of Dr. Rippe's major reference Lifestyle Medicine (CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL) is anticipated to be published in March 2013.

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TOXIC SUGAR CLAIMS ARE DEBUNKED AT GLOBAL CONFERENCE

San Diego, CA (April 22, 2012) Two sweetener myths, one comparing differences in metabolic activity between sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS), and another suggesting sugar is toxic to the body, suffered serious setbacks at this year’s Experimental Biology 2012 conference in San Diego.

In fact, the scientific community gave it’s highest rating to the symposium entitled “Fructose, Sucrose, and High Fructose Corn Syrup: Modern Scientific Findings and Health Implications.”

In it, renowned cardiologist and researcher, James M. Rippe, M.D., presented recent findings from research conducted at Rippe Lifestyle Institute (RLI) demonstrating that there were no differences between high fructose corn syrup and sucrose at any dosage level on any parameter related to energy regulation and appetite (e.g. insulin, leptin, ghrelin). Dr. Rippe also showed data suggesting that neither HFCS nor sucrose led to increased risk of diabetes, the metabolic syndrome, or coronary heart disease. He also summarized data from the RLI Research Team suggesting that there was no increased fat accumulation in either the liver or the muscle from consuming either of these sugars.

The presentation, entitled “The Health Implications of Sucrose, High Fructose Corn Syrup and Fructose: What Do We Really Know?” sought to bring together the world’s leading experts on modern understandings of sugar metabolism and health implications. It generated a packed, standing-room-only audience of 1,400 scientists, attesting to the high level of interest in this topic.

During the session, Dr. Rippe presented findings from recent randomized controlled trials, “which are the highest level of evidence that you can have,” he notes, “on what we really know about sucrose and high fructose corn syrup. I presented five different studies that basically all come to the same conclusion that various levels of consumption of either high fructose corn syrup or sucrose are absolutely identical in terms of their metabolism and health effects.”

“So we have very compelling evidence now that really locks down even further that there is no difference between high fructose corn syrup and sucrose,” says Dr. Rippe. “People in the food industry, companies that are substituting sucrose for high fructose corn syrup, are doing so 100% for marketing purposes. From the medical health consequences, from the standpoint of metabolism, the two are identical. Within the scientific community, there is no longer any debate that there is any difference between high fructose corn syrup and sucrose.”

The Medical and Nutrition Committee of the American Society of Nutrition sponsored the symposium.

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Sort out the science for how life choices affect health in SAGE Reference’s Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine and Health

Los Angeles (November 15, 2011) We’re continually bombarded by dramatic news reports and magazine cover stories about how different lifestyle habits both negatively and positively affect our health. And at times, one set of data contradicts another. Clarifying all that information, and helping the reader discern sound, evidence-based science from fads, is the new authoritative Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine and Health, published by SAGE Reference.

In two information-packed volumes, Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine and Health helps define the interdisciplinary field of lifestyle health, providing historical and contemporary coverage of relevant lifestyle and health topics and issues. Included is a useful appendix containing listings of health promotion agencies and organizations, along with selected websites for research studies. The 321 A–Z entries, each written by an expert in the field and featuring accompanying bibliographies and suggested readings, are helpfully organized in a Reader’s Guide within the following key topics areas:

  • Aging
  • Behavioral Medicine
  • Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Chronic Disease, Disease Prevention, and Lifestyle Behaviors
  • Concepts in Lifestyle Medicine
  • Epidemiology and Demographics of Lifestyle-Related Health Issues
  • Exercise Physiology
  • Exercise-Related Injuries
  • Food and Nutrition
  • Health Policy, Public Health, and Health Education
  • Immunology and Infectious Diseases
  • Internal Medicine
  • Men’s Health
  • Obesity and Weight Management
  • Pain Management
  • Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine
  • Physical Activity and Inactivity
  • Physical Therapy
  • Preventive Medicine
  • Substance Use and Abuse
  • Women’s Health

Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine and Heath is written accessibly, making it useful for a broad audience, including students and academics in the fields of health, physical education, biology, medicine, nursing and allied health, physical therapy, nutrition, public health, and health communication, as well as for lay readers interested in health. This is a must-have resource for libraries everywhere because it empowers readers to lead and promote healthier lifestyles.

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ENCYCLOPEDIA OF LIFESTYLE MEDICINE AND HEALTH PUBLISHED ONLINE

(December 8, 2011) James M. Rippe, M.D. and Rippe Health are pleased to announce the online publication of the Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine and Health edited by Dr. Rippe (SAGE Reference, Thousand Oaks, CA 2012). The Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine and Health provides a wide-ranging resource for individuals seeking objective, science based information upon which to base their lifestyle practices and habits.

According to SAGE Publications, “The Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine and Health sorts out the science behind nightly news reports and magazine cover stories, helping the reader to discern sound, evidence-based advice from that which is merely fad.”

“We are proud to announce the online availability of the Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine and Health,” stated Dr. Rippe. “This comprehensive, two volume Encyclopedia thoroughly covers important topics in lifestyle medicine from A-Z. I hope and believe it will advance the field of lifestyle medicine and make this information accessible to a much broader audience.”

The Encyclopedia brings together the vast experience, reasoned judgment and wisdom of more than 255 contributors who have written over 350 essays on every conceivable topic related to how daily lifestyle habits and practices impact on health. The volumes convey the latest research on lifestyle medicine incorporating content from such areas as health psychology, communication, public policy and health promotion, and disease prevention, among others.

SAGE Publications continues, “This comprehensive reference source is written accessibly making it useful for a broad audience including students and academics in the fields of health, physical education, biology, medicine, nursing and allied health, physical therapy, nutrition, public health, and health communication, as well as for lay readers interested in learning how to lead a healthier lifestyle.”

Dr. Rippe and the Rippe Health research team first coined the term “Lifestyle Medicine” to define the study of how lifestyle habits impact on health with the publication of the first edition of Dr. Rippe’s academic textbook, Lifestyle Medicine (Blackwell Science, 1999). The second edition of this academic textbook is due to be published late in 2012. Dr. Rippe also serves as the Editor in Chief of the only academic, peer reviewed journal in lifestyle medicine, the American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine.

“This book is a testimony to the hard work of many individuals but I would particularly like to acknowledge the key role played by my Associate Editor, Mary Abbott Waite, Ph.D., who made substantial contributions to the Encyclopedia at every step during of the publication process,” says Dr. Rippe.

More information on the Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine and Health may be obtained at http://www.sagepub.com/books/Book230684.

The hardcover edition of the Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine and Health will be published in January of 2012. The Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine and Health is the third major academic publication edited by the RLI publishing team in 2011. Dr. Rippe’s ICU textbook, Irwin and Rippe’s Intensive Care Medicine and the companion book, Irwin and Rippe’s Procedures, Techniques and Minimally Invasive Monitoring in the Intensive Care Unit were both published in the Fall of 2011. A major academic textbook called Obesity: Prevention and Management, co-edited by Dr. Rippe and Dr. Ted Angelopoulos, Research Director at RLI, will be published in May of 2012.

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5th Edition of Irwin and Rippe's Procedures, Techniques and Minimally Invasive Monitoring in Intensive Care Medicine Published

(October 13, 2011) James M. Rippe, M.D. and Rippe Health are pleased to announce the publication of the 5th edition of Irwin and Rippe's Procedures, Techniques and Minimally Invasive Monitoring in Intensive Care Medicine (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011, Philadelphia, PA).

"We are pleased and proud to announce the publication of the most recent edition of our book," stated Dr. Rippe. "This book covers common techniques and procedures utilized in the intensive care unit and puts them in a user-friendly format."

Irwin and Rippe's Procedures, Techniques and Minimally Invasive Monitoring in Intensive Care Medicine is a large format, soft-cover book that is co-edited by Drs. Richard Irwin, James Rippe, Alan Lisbon and Stephen Heard. It has over 50 co-authors and 340 pages detailing all of the major procedures and techniques practiced in modern intensive care medicine.

Irwin and Rippe's Procedures, Techniques and Minimally Invasive Monitoring in Intensive Care Medicine is a companion book that draws material from Irwin and Rippe's Intensive Care Medicine (7th edition, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia, PA) which was published earlier this month.

Previous editions of Irwin and Rippe's Procedures, Techniques and Minimally Invasive Monitoring in Intensive Care Medicine book have enjoyed great popularity, particularly among Intensive Care Fellows, House Officers, and other health professionals.

Dr. Rippe continued, "This book is an outgrowth of the longstanding productive publishing relationship that I have had with Dr. Irwin. Additionally, Beth Grady, our Editorial Director, has done her typical outstanding job on this book, as have the excellent publishing team at Lippincott Williams & Wilkins."

The Rippe Health publishing team remains very active. This team has been responsible for writing and/or editing 44 books and remains active in diverse areas of medical and trade publishing.

The two-volume Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine and Health, edited by Dr. Rippe (SAGE Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA) will be published in December. An academic textbook, Obesity: Prevention and Treatment, co-edited by Dr. Rippe and Dr. Ted Angelopoulos (Research Director of Rippe Lifestyle Institute) is due to be published in the spring of 2012 (CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL).

The second edition of Dr. Rippe's major academic textbook Lifestyle Medicine is anticipated to be published in late 2012 (CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL).

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7th Edition of Irwin and Rippe's Intensive Care Medicine Published

(October 6, 2011) James M. Rippe, M.D. and Rippe Health are pleased to announce the publication of the 7th edition of Irwin and Rippe's Intensive Care Medicine (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011, Philadelphia, PA).

Irwin and Rippe's Intensive Care Medicine is the leading ICU textbook in the world and is in virtually every major intensive care unit in the United States. The book is approximately 2,300 pages long with 216 chapters and over 280 contributing authors representing international leaders in virtually every branch of modern intensive care.

Irwin and Rippe's Intensive Care Medicine was the first book to combine all aspects of medical intensive care, coronary care, surgical intensive care, anesthesiology intensive care, and neurology intensive care.

"I am pleased and proud to announce the 7th edition of our textbook," stated Dr. Rippe. "This textbook was first conceived when I was a house officer at Massachusetts General Hospital. Now, almost 30 years later, I believe it has fundamentally changed the face of modern intensive care practice."

"Due to the wonderful efforts of my co-editor, Dr. Richard Irwin, and my Editorial Director, Beth Grady, as well as our distinguished group of internationally recognized section editors and authors, the textbook continues to evolve to provide up-to-date, definitive guidelines, and evidence based practices for physicians taking care of desperately ill patients in intensive care units around the world," continued Dr. Rippe.

The Rippe Health publishing team has written or edited 44 books and remains active in all aspects of writing, editing, and publishing. Irwin and Rippe's Procedures, Techniques and Minimally Invasive Monitoring in Intensive Care Medicine, which is a companion book to Irwin and Rippe's Intensive Care Medicine, has also been published this month.

Additionally, a two-volume Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine and Health, edited by Dr. Rippe, will be published in December (SAGE Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA). An academic textbook, Obesity: Prevention and Treatment, co-edited by Dr. Rippe and Dr. Ted Angelopoulos (Research Director of Rippe Lifestyle Institute), is due to be published in the Spring of 2012 (CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL).

The second edition of Dr. Rippe's major academic textbook Lifestyle Medicine (CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL) is anticipated to be published in late 2012.

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High Fructose Corn Syrup and Sucrose are Nutritionally Equivalent and May Help Improve Dietary Quality During Weight Loss

Latest Findings Presented at the Obesity 2011 - the 29th Annual Scientific Meeting of The Obesity Society

ORLANDO, Florida, October 2, 2011

High Fructose Corn Syrup and Sucrose are Nutritionally Equivalent and May Help Improve Dietary Quality During Weight Loss
Authors Joshua Lowndes, Terry Papadopoulos, Britte Lowther, Diana Kawiecki, Zhiping Yu, Sabrina Pardo, James Rippe


Background: Reducing energy intake is a primary strategy for inducing weight loss, but this also often results in a reduction in non-caloric nutrient intake. Strategies to maintain or improve dietary quality in the face of initiation of a hypocaloric diet are therefore desirable.

Methods: 156 participants were randomly assigned to one of 5 study groups. 4 diet groups followed an ADA exchange diet with a 500Kcal/day deficit while consuming milk sweetened with either HFCS or sucrose daily. The volume of milk was prescribed so the added sugar contributed either 10% (H10 and S10) or 20% (H20 or 20%) of the caloric target for each individual. All participants also followed a regular exercise regime. A 5th non-dietary group was included as an exercise only control group (EO). Food intake was assessed via 3-day food records completed at the beginning and end of the 12 week period.

Results: All 4 diet groups lost weight (p<0.05). Milk consumption averaged 96.6% across all 4 diet groups. Across all 5 groups energy intake decreased by 294Kcals/day (p<0.001), irrespective of group assignment. All 4 diet groups increased intake of Vitamin D (H10:9.4 ± 2.5, H20: 9.1 ± 5.0, S10: 8.9 ± 2.9, S20: 9.1 ± 3.6µg, p<0.001), calcium (H10: 623.7 ±494.8, H20: 540.0 ± 272.3, S10: 749.7 ± 450.8, S20: 564.5 ± 429.0mg, p<0.001) and potassium (H10: 759.2 ±890.4, H20: 547.6 ±554.9, S10: 955.9 ± 812.7, S20: 678.2 ± 728.9mg, p<0.001).

Conclusion: These data show that HFCS and Sucrose are nutritionally equivalent and that significant amounts of both can be consumed daily as part of a successful weight loss diet. Furthermore, consumption of these sweeteners in the form of low fat, sweetened milk is both palatable and helps improve important aspects of dietary quality even in the face of a caloric deficit.

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Research Shows High Fructose Corn Syrup and Sucrose are Nutritionally Equivalent and May Help Improve Dietary Quality

Latest Findings Presented at the 2011 American Dietetic Association FNCE Conference

SAN DIEGO, California, September 25, 2011

High Fructose Corn Syrup and Sucrose are Nutritionally Equivalent and May Help Improve Dietary Quality
D. Kawiecki, S. Pardo, T. Papadopoulos, L. Cooper, V. Nguyen, B. Lowther, J. Lowndes, J. Rippe


Learning Outcome: The reader will understand how commonly consumed components of the diet can be incorporated into a healthy diet.

Background: This study evaluated the effects of consuming either 10% or 20% of calories from either high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) or sucrose (SUC) sweetened 1% milk as part of a eucaloric (weight stable) diet on the metabolism and health effects of different sugars. This report describes the effects of two sweeteners at two levels of consumption on dietary quality.

Methods: For 10 weeks each of 115 participants followed the above referenced diet. Study participants were taught how to complete 3 day food records which were reviewed by study dietitians prior to, and at the end of, the 10 week intervention to assess compliance with the study diet and dietary quality. Results: Interventional compliance was high, at over 96%. No significant weight gain occurred in any of the intervention groups. No significant increase in calories or differences in calorie consumption occurred in any group. The increase in percentage of calories for the entire cohort from carbohydrate (49.2±7.8 vs. 53.9±6.2%, p<0.001) was offset by a reduction in the % of calories from fat (33.1±6.8 vs. 26.9±5.1%, p<0.001) with no change in protein (19.6±3.7 vs. 18.8±3.4, p>0.05). Significant increases in dietary calcium (954.6±762.3 vs. 1992.2±841.8mg, p<0.001), vitamin D (5.3±5.6 vs. 17.0±7.7mg, p<0.001) and potassium (2660±1203.3 vs. 3826±1381.3mg, p<0.001) occurred. Conclusion: These data show that HFCS and Sucrose are nutritionally equivalent, can be consumed at 10-20% of calories (5-10% of calories as fructose) without weight gain and may improve dietary quality by improving palatability and compliance with nutrient dense foods.

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Violence Remains in Top 10 Causes of Death

Rippe Health Editorial Team Joins Forces With CDC On A Key Issue In Lifestyle Medicine

Los Angeles, CA (September 16, 2011) Suicide, child abuse, playground fights, gang violence, sexual assault, and domestic violence are just a few examples of violence that touch people in all walks of life and communities everywhere. Homicide and suicide remain in the top ten leading causes of death for people from birth to age 64. How do you combat an issue that takes so many forms and has so many causes? The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine (published by SAGE) have developed a special issue to take a closer look at violence prevention.

“Violence is an unfortunate reality of the world we live in with direct implications for health” stated Dr. James Rippe, Editor in Chief of the American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. “We are delighted to join with the CDC to bring this important issue to the forefront of medical discussion.”

The special issue is entitled “Lifestyle Medicine, Public Health and Violence.”

Because of the complexities surrounding violence, its impact on society is deep and multifaceted. Aside from the physical effects, which have prompted the American Medical Association to recognize violence as a health issue, there are also very real monetary effects. According to the American Journal of Preventative Medicine, the estimated annual cost of medical care and productivity lost because of violence each year is estimated at more than $70 billion.

To help explore these issues and begin working on some solutions, guest co-editors Dr. Tamara Haegerich and Dr. Linda Dahlberg from CDC’s Division of Violence Prevention sought articles that provide information about the prevalence of violence, circumstances surrounding violence, and even effective or promising approaches for violence prevention. Additionally, the foreword, written by Dr. Linda Degutis, Director of CDC’s Injury Center, and Dr. Robin Ikeda, Director of CDC’s Office of Noncommunicable Diseases, Injury, and Environmental Health focuses particularly on efforts most relevant for health care providers.

“Clinicians play an integral role in preventing violence on both individual and community levels. By understanding and recognizing risks for violence in their patients, they can identify warning signs and make referrals to effective preventive services. They can add to the voice of the community in raising awareness of violence, and in implementing evidence-based strategies to prevent it,” said Dr. Degutis. “Working together, we can weave the fabric of a non-violent community, where people can live safe, healthy and productive lives.”

The American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine features the following additional articles by CDC authors and their colleagues:

  • “Violence as a Public Health Risk” by Tamara M. Haegerich and Linda L. Dahlberg
  • “Sexual Violence Victimization of Women: Prevalence, Characteristics, and the Role of Public Health and Prevention” by Kathleen C. Basile and Sharon G. Smith
  • “Addressing Self-Directed Violence Prevention for Preventive Medicine Practitioners” by Alex E. Crosby, Ayanna V. Buckner, and Beverly D. Taylor.
  • “Intimate Partner Violence and Adverse Health Consequences: Implications for Clinicians” by Michele C. Black
  • “A Review of Physical and Mental Health Consequences of Child Abuse and Neglect and Implications for Practice” by Rebecca T. Leeb, Terri Lewis, and Adam J. Zolotor
  • “Violence and Men’s Health: Understanding the Etiological Underpinnings of Men’s Experiences with Violence” by Tamara M. Haegerich and Jeffrey E. Hall

The special edition of the American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine is available free for a limited time at: http://ajlm.sagepub.com/content/5/5.toc.

This effort is the second partnership between the CDC and the American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. The first, published in 2009, focused on lifestyle medicine and unintentional injury prevention.

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American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine (AJLM) is a peer-reviewed bi-monthly resource for practitioners seeking to incorporate lifestyle practices into clinical medicine. AJLM provides commentaries and research reviews on nutrition and diet, cardiovascular disease, obesity, anxiety and depression, sleep problems, metabolic disease, and more. www.ajl.sagepub.com

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Incorporating Lifestyle Medicine Into a Large Health Care System: The Orlando Health Experience

Dr. Rippe is the Director of the Lifestyle Medicine Initiative at Orlando Health and leads a collaborative partnership to bring Lifestyle Medicine to Central Florida through the Lifestyle Medicine Initiative at Orlando Health. This article describes how Orlando Health, and its initiative to incorporate lifestyle medicine concepts into its core operating principles. Great progress has been made in the past 18 months in this initiative although numerous challenges remain. The authors enumerate both progress and challenges. They hope the experience at Orlando Health will challenge and inspire other health care systems to also take a more proactive stance in incorporating lifestyle medicine into their culture and core operating principles.

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American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine inaugurates a series of clinical presentations titled "Lifestyle Medicine Rounds from Orlando Health"

Dr. Rippe leads the first "Lifestyle Medicine Rounds From Orlando Health." The purpose of these rounds is to explore how the principles of lifestyle medicine can be applied to the care of hospitalized patients and to demonstrate how lifestyle medicine can be incorporated into traditional medical education venues. Orlando Health is the first hospital healthcare system to embrace lifestyle medicine as a core operating principle.

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Lifestyle Medicine and Health Care Reform

Dr. Rippe and colleagues express in this editorial, that until prescription of positive lifestyle practices becomes a central component of modern American medicine, we are unlikely to improve outcomes or control costs of health care in the United States. We entered health care in the first place to make a difference in people's lives. Forming true partnerships with our patients and offering evidence-based advice on how daily habits and actions profoundly affect long-term health is overdue. In this regard, there is no time to waste. Lifestyle medicine really is true health care reform and must be put into practice immediately, beginning within the medical community itself.

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Injury Prevention Strategies for Health Care Providers from The CDC and American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine

(Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore and Washington DC, January 12, 2010):

The American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine (AJLM), in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and its National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, has devoted the entire January/February 2010 issue to injury prevention. It is a primer for all health care professionals on the subject.

"I urge every health care professional to read this issue of AJLM cover to cover and put its extensive information and practical advice to use," writes Editor-in-Chief James M. Rippe, MD.

By any measure, the toll of preventable injuries in the United States is stunning.

  • In 2006, more than 120,000 people died from unintentional injuries in the United States.
  • In 2007, almost 28 million people experienced a nonfatal injury serious enough to require a visit to the emer­gency department.
  • One-third of all emergency depart­ment visits are a result of injury.

Injuries, as well as how to prevent them, are topics that every health care profes­sional needs to understand. Aspects of lifestyle create hazards for unin­tentional injuries. But it also presents opportunities to reduce both the number and the impact of these injuries.

Articles include:

"Older Adult Fall Prevention: Perceptions, Beliefs, and Behaviors" by Judy A. Stevens, PhD, Rita K. Noonan, PhD, and Laurence Z. Rubenstein, MD.

"Vitamin D and Injury Prevention" by Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, Michael G. Kimlin, PhD, and Kathryn N. Porter, MS, RD.

"Preventing Unintentional Injury: A Review of Behavior Change Theories for Primary Care" by David A. Sleet, PhD, FAAHB, Andrea Carlson Gielen, ScD, ScM, Shane Diekman, PhD, MPH, and Robin Ikeda, MD, MPH.

The themed issue of AJLM on Lifestyle Medicine and Injury Prevention is available free for a limited time at http://ajl.sagepub.com/content/vol4/issue1/.

American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine (AJLM) is a bimonthly professional resource for practitioners seeking to incorporate lifestyle practices into clinical medicine. AJLM publishes a broad range of articles intended to help primary care providers and other health professionals guide their patients to lead healthier lifestyles. The journal provides commentaries and research reviews on nutrition and diet, cardiovascular disease, obesity, anxiety and depression, sleep problems, metabolic disease, and more—in a readable, immediately accessible, and usable format. http://ajlm.sagepub.com

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American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine Publishes Proceedings of 2009 Building Healthy Lifestyles Conference

Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore and Washington DC (August 27, 2009) – The American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine (AJLM) has published the proceedings of the 2009 Building Healthy Lifestyles Conference: From Research to Practice. The conference was sponsored by Arizona State University, the National Institute of Health and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

The conference had four objectives:

  1. Present the current science concerning the intersection between physical activity, nutrition, and wellness for building healthy lifestyles and for reducing the cardiovascular disease.
  2. Discuss how the research findings may be disseminated into the community.
  3. Discuss recommendations for future promotion of healthy lifestyles.
  4. Develop a collaborative framework for future research.

"This supplement marks a big step for AJLM as the leading journal and content provider in the field of lifestyle medicine, adding to the honors it has received since it was launched in 2007," said Editor-in-Chief Dr. James Rippe, MD, a prominent cardiologist and author. "This was a prestigious conference and we're honored to have published its proceedings."

The supplement to AJLM, "3rd Annual Building Healthy Lifestyles Conference: From Research to Practice, Modifying Lifestyles to Enhance Physical Activity, Diet, and Reduce Cardiovascular Disease" was published on behalf of Arizona State University. It was guest-edited by ASU's Dr. Barbara Ainsworth and Kelley Pettee Gabriel, PhD, Assistant Professor, College of Public Health at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

AJLM is a bimonthly journal published by SAGE for practitioners seeking to incorporate lifestyle practices and activities into clinical medicine, emphasizing the interaction between traditional therapies and lifestyle changes. Since its launch in 2007, AJLM has explored such important topics as: cardiovascular disease; stress/anxiety; pain/arthritis; diabetes/metabolic disease, obesity, lifestyle interventions in children; metabolic syndrome; women's health; hypertension; men's health, and dyslipidemia.

The "3rd Annual Building Healthy Lifestyles Conference: From Research to Practice, Modifying Lifestyles to Enhance Physical Activity, Diet, and Reduce Cardiovascular Disease" supplement to ALJM is freely available for a limited time at http://ajl.sagepub.com/content/vol3/1_suppl/.

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"Ask Dr. Rippe" Debuts in Orlando Home & Leisure Magazine

(Orlando, July 1, 2009) - Have you ever wondered if there was a simple secret that could lead to better health? The answer is ... found on page 77 in the July 2009 issue of Orlando Home & Leisure magazine. It's the question of the month for the magazine's new column "Ask Dr. Rippe Medical Q & A."

     

The column is written by Dr. James Rippe, a nationally recognized cardiologist and well known physician. Dr. Rippe was featured in an article in Orlando Home & Leisure in the June 2009 issue, and touted as the pioneer doc who could "save Orlando." Dr. Rippe says that one of his goals is to make Orlando the healthiest city in America by teaching people how to make healthier choices in their daily habits. He calls his philosophy "Lifestyle Medicine" and it has rapidly become the 21st century's hottest new brand of medicine.

Toward that end, Dr. Rippe has partnered with many organizations and institutions in the community including Orlando Health, his hospital partner, and the University of Central Florida where he is a professor of Biomedical Sciences and Chairman of the Center for Lifestyle Medicine. With the new medical column, he hopes to reach even more people with his message of good health. Best of all, anyone can send Dr. Rippe a question. So get started! By the way, the answer to the July question is ... regular physical activity.

To read the "Ask Dr. Rippe" columns in Orlando Home & Leisure, click here.

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Orlando Home & Leisure Magazine Features Dr. James Rippe in June Issue

Orlando, June 1, 2009 – It's hard to miss Dr. James Rippe if you're in Orlando. You might say the nationally known cardiologist is just about everywhere these days, from the University of Central Florida where he's a professor of Biomedical Sciences and head of the UCF Center for Lifestyle Medicine, to overseeing patients undergoing a comprehensive Rippe Health Evaluation, to Orlando Health, his hospital partner, to conducting and publishing multiple research trials in lifestyle medicine at the Rippe Lifestyle Institute at Celebration. And if that weren't enough, now he's featured in the June 2009 issue of Orlando Home & Leisure magazine, where he's touted as the doc who's on a mission to make you healthy.

     

The headline reads, "Can This Guy Make Orlando The Healthiest City In America?" That's Dr. Rippe's stated goal and the article describes his efforts and philosophy. "If we can consistently say to people, in ways they can take action on, that you can have more out of life and feel better about your life by things you do every day, that will yield a lot of benefits. If we can make a difference in people's lives here in Orlando, then we can serve as a model for the rest of the country" he explains.

Dr. Rippe hopes his partnerships throughout the Orlando community will motivate and inspire citizens to live healthier lives through their daily lifestyle choices. What one eats, drinks, does, is the crux of his brand of medicine.

And he's not done yet. Furthering his goal, now he's formed a partnership with Orlando Home & Leisure. He's writing a new column for the magazine called "Ask Dr. Rippe". Now you can get your medical Q&A every month. Of course, you could just run into the good doc himself to ask your question. After all, he's just about everywhere these days!

To read the full Orlando Home & Leisure article, click here.

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SQUEEZING CALORIES? NEW STUDY FINDS THAT LOW-FAT POPCORN BEFORE LUNCH DOES NOT INCREASE TOTAL CALORIE INTAKE Orville Redenbacher's SmartPop! can help 'take the edge off,' manage intake

NEW ORLEANS, LA., April 20, 2009 – A filling but calorie controlled snack, such as Orville Redenbacher's 94 percent fat-free SmartPop! popcorn, before a meal has been shown to curb hunger without increasing total calorie intake, says a new study released today.

Guided by health and nutrition guru Dr. James Rippe of the Rippe Lifestyle Institute, the study found that subjects who ate up to six cups of low-fat popcorn (100 calories) 30 minutes before lunch consumed the same amount of total calories, including the meal, as those who consumed only water. In contrast, when subjects ate a cup of potato chips (150 calories) before the meal, they ate significantly more total calories including the meal.

"Our findings suggest that some snack foods, such as low-fat popcorn, can be a satisfying and effective way to manage calories," Rippe said. "Reducing calorie consumption is absolutely essential in the fight against overweight and obesity. Popcorn is unique because it supplies such a big volume of food for relatively few calories."

Thirty five subjects ages 20 to 50 consumed either water or a snack before the lunch, and ate as much of the meal as they wished. Total caloric intake was not different and averaged 717 calories when subjects had water alone or water plus either 1 cup or 6 cups of low-fat popcorn. However, when they were given 1 cup of potato chips, total calorie intake, including the meal, jumped 12 percent and was significantly higher than all three other test conditions.

Results were presented at the Experimental Biology 2009 conference in New Orleans, attended by roughly 13,000 scientists. "We are proud to put Orville Redenbacher's SmartPop! on the front lines in the weight management battle," said Mark Toth, brand director. "The great news for those of us who watch our weight is that we can have it both ways -- good taste and good health. SmartPop! low-fat popcorn also has the benefit of being a 100 percent whole grain and a source of fiber."

Orville Redenbacher's SmartPop! offers six cups of hot and fresh popcorn per serving, which helps consumers feel satisfied on fewer calories.   Orville Redenbacher's popcorn pops up lighter and fluffier than ordinary popcorn. The brand has many other nutritional benefits including being 94 percent fat free, with zero grams of trans fat and zero milligrams of cholesterol. What's more, whole grains support health heart and previous research has shown that popcorn consumers get more than twice the amount of whole grains as is typical in the U.S. diet plus 20 percent more total fiber.

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NEW RESEARCH SHOWS HEALTHY CHOICE LIVES UP TO ITS NAME

Latest Findings Presented at the 2009 Experimental Biology Conference

OMAHA, Neb., April 20, 2009 – ConAgra Foods announced today, new research shows that people who ate Healthy Choice® really did get healthier. Participants in the 24-week study, on average, lost 18 pounds – all as fat – trimmed their waistlines by about three inches, and lowered their cholesterol by 12 points. Leading cardiologist Dr. James Rippe, founder and director of the Rippe Lifestyle Institute, led the research team that conducted the study, which will be presented during the 2009 Experimental Biology Conference April 18-22 in New Orleans, La.

"We know that healthier eating and being physically active are key to maintaining a healthy lifestyle, but when pressed for time, it's a challenge to achieve and maintain such a lifestyle," said study author Dr. Rippe. "These findings are important because they show in a long-term study that Healthy Choice products offer the convenience and nutrition people are seeking to help them reach their goals."

Men and women with health conditions common to many Americans, such as being overweight and having elevated cholesterol, followed a plan centered on eating Healthy Choice products every day. Overall portion and calorie control was emphasized along with choosing other foods consistent with healthy eating such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy and lean meat. Participants also became more physically active by starting a simple walking program, starting with 15 minutes three days per week and progressing to 45 minutes four days per week. A control group followed the physical activity program without making changes in their food choices.

In addition to significant positive changes in body weight and cholesterol, the Healthy Choice group also showed significant improvements in overall diet quality compared to the control group, including reduced intakes of fat, calories, saturated fat and cholesterol and increases in fiber intake.

"These findings reinforce our commitment to providing delicious, healthful and convenient meals that make it easy for people to not only control their portions, but also get the positive nutrition they're seeking from ingredients like lean meat, vegetables, whole grains, and fiber," said Kristin Reimers, PhD, Nutrition Manager, ConAgra Foods. "All Healthy Choice products meet the American Heart Association's nutrition certification, and each package features nutrition information on how this meal fits into USDA's MyPyramid daily recommended amounts for food groups."

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DR JAMES RIPPE LAUNCHES HEALTH INITIATIVE WITH ORLANDO HEALTH & LEISURE MAGAZINE!

ORLANDO, Fla., March 24, 2009 — Orlando Home & Leisure has joined the Rippe Lifestyle Institute, Dr. James Rippe, Orlando Health and the University of Central Florida in a major new regional health initiative. Spearheaded by renowned cardiologist and lifestyle medicine pioneer, Dr. James Rippe, the effort is aimed at making Orlando the healthiest city in the nation."Everyone can become healthier if doctors and consumers collaborate more effectively," Dr. Rippe explains. "This is a multi-pronged program designed to raise the public's awareness of how to help themselves become healthier, while at the same time educating doctors how to better communicate with, and participate in, keeping their patients healthy, rather than just treating illnesses."

Dr. Rippe is widely acknowledged as a leading authority on preventive cardiology, health, fitness and healthy weight loss. The Harvard-trained physician is Professor of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Central Florida where he serves as Chairman of its Center for Lifestyle Medicine. The Rippe Lifestyle Institute is located in Celebration, FL.

Under his leadership the Rippe Lifestyle Institute has conducted numerous research projects on reducing cardiovascular risks, fitness walking, weight loss, running, strength training, cycling, cholesterol reduction and low fat diets. Dr. Rippe has written over 300 publications on issues in medicine and 41 books, including 23 medical texts and 18 books on health and fitness for the general public.

"We're very excited about our partnership with Dr. Rippe," said Steve Blount, editor of Orlando Home & Leisure. "City magazines should be about improving the lives of the people who read them, and Dr. Rippe's whole career has been about improving quality of life. His international stature as a researcher is a reflection of his dedication to making people healthier."

Beginning with the June 2009 edition, the magazine's Wellness department will now lead off with an article by Dr. Rippe focusing on specific ways readers can improve their health and quality of life.

"We're lucky to have Dr. Rippe and the Rippe Lifestyle Institute here in Central Florida," said Kathy Brown, publisher of Orlando Home & Leisure. "By making Orlando healthy, this can be a demonstration for how an entire region can improve its health."

 

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